I am worried about someone!

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, you can ask for help.

Call 000 or visit your local emergency department immediately.

Like a medical emergency, a mental health crisis should be treated the same. Get help, get to a hospital.

If you are with someone that you are concerned about you can start by taking one or all of these steps below:

  • Contact Lifeline – 13 11 14 (available 24/7) Free confidential support or chat to a Crisis Supporter online at lifeline.org.au every night. They provide support and information if you are supporting someone that is at risk.
  • Talk to the person you are worried about – tell them what you are worried about. Ask them if they are thinking of suicide. If they say they are, or if they say they are not but your gut feeling tells you otherwise, tell them they don’t have to go through this alone and then take the next step to help them get support to stay safe.
  • Get help and support to stay alive – contact a helpline, take them to their GP, a hospital emergency department or other support service. You don’t have to have the answers, you just need to help the person at risk get to the right help to stay safe and alive while they get help. You do not need to fix them or have any answers, you just need to get them to help.
  • If their life is in danger – call 000 right now, that is what it is for. If you feel that someone will hurt themselves or they have told you they will, call for help now.

If there is a crisis but not an immediate threat to life contact:

Lower South West Mental Health Services on 9753 6400 (Operates 8 AM to 4:30 PM Monday to Friday)
This triage service operates from Busselton and is automatically diverted after hours to Rural Link (which may also be reached on 1800 552 002). 
You can then get professional help locally to talk about how you are feeling.

WA First Nations specific suicide crisis line
1800 370 747

Lifeline
13 11 14

Suicide call back service
1300 659 467

Why does someone consider suicide?

People considering suicide often feel very isolated and lonely. They may feel that nobody can help them or understand them. They believe that suicide is the only way out of the difficulties that they are experiencing.  For more information see the download.

Download “Factsheet: What does it mean to be suicidal?” Factsheet_ps_what-does-it-mean-to-be-suicidal.pdf – Downloaded 46 times – 489 KB

What should I do if I know someone who is thinking of suicide?

Do something now: If you or someone you know is considering suicide, act immediately. Don’t assume that things will get better without help or that they will seek help on their own. Reaching out now could save a life.  For more information read the download.

Download “Tool kit: Help someone at risk of suicide” Toolkit_help-someone-at-risk-of-suicide-1.pdf – Downloaded 47 times – 698 KB

Feeling scared, sad or lonely?

If you’re feeling stressed, anxious, depressed or having difficulty coping your first step is to contact your local GP for an appointment to talk things over.  Click here for more information on getting support locally.

Toolkits

Download “Tool kit: Help someone at risk of suicide” Toolkit_help-someone-at-risk-of-suicide-1.pdf – Downloaded 47 times – 698 KB

Download “Toolkit: Suicide prevention information - Aboriginal TSI people” Toolkit_suicide-prevention-info-aboriginal-tsi-people-1.pdf – Downloaded 40 times – 1 MB

Factsheets

Download “Factsheet: What does it mean to be suicidal?” Factsheet_ps_what-does-it-mean-to-be-suicidal.pdf – Downloaded 46 times – 489 KB